Tag Archives: emilia romagna

Dozza and Brisighella

Dozza

Dozza’s Painted Walls

La Valle del Senio, in Romagna, like a necklace encrusted with precious jewels, is dotted with fascinating little borghi in which history and art live side by side and which offer a glimpse of contemporary Italian life apparently immune to the demands of modernity. Two such magical places are Brisighella and Dozza.

Brisighella was founded in the 13th century by the Italian condottiere Maghinardo Pagano. The lords of Faenza began building the Rock of Brisighella a century later, which then took its final form during the lordship of Venice, in the 16th century. The borgo is formed of a labyrinth of ancient narrow streets, of which the most famous is Via degli Asini (Street of the Donkeys.) Over the town dominates the Pieve di S. Giovanni Ottavo, erected in the fifth century and enlarged between the 11th and 12th centuries. The lore of Brisighella is filled with interesting anecdotes and historical tidbits from ancient to contemporary times, and the town is perfect for leisurely walks – distances are short, the streets are well-kept, the traffic is minimal, opportunities for gelati and cappuccini abound. A local guide with detailed knowledge is available and will add immensely to the understanding of the town.

Dozza, another little artistic jewel, is only a few kilometers from Brisighella and is known for two things: one is the Rocca Sforzesca, built by Caterina Sforza in the late Quattrocento and later used as a palazzo signorile. The borgo itself is of ancient origin, probably founded by the Gauls well before the Roman conquest. The Rock is powerful, massive, and was inhabited by the descendants of the Malvezzi, lords during the Renaissance, until 1960. Today the Rock houses a museum and a sophisticated wine bar in which all manner of local wines can be tasted and purchased.

Riolo Terme in Romagna

Hotel Golfo delle Terme

Hotel Golfo delle Terme

Riolo Terme is a lovely little village in the Province of Ravenna, in Romagna. Its main attractions are the tranquillity and beauty of the town itself and of the surrounding Valle del Senio, its Castello Sforzesco, built by Caterina Sforza towards the end of the 15th century, and of course its thermal baths, le terme.

To stroll the cobbled streets of Riolo is to enter a different reality. Cars and motorini are very much in evidence, but they are mostly parked. There is none of the obsessive and overwhelming traffic of the major Italian cities; people go about their business mostly on foot, serenely and urbanely. Surrounding the town, everywhere, there are the rolling vistas of the Valle del Senio. Here you can select your favorite cafe’ or gelateria, stroll there every day, get to know your host, and ritually have your cornetto e caffe’.

One of the best hotels in the city is the Hotel Golf delle Terme, periodically restructured and modernised since ancient times, with spacious common rooms for group activities, beautiful decor, and understated old-world elegance. Double rooms can be had in two flavors: more spacious but lacking the view of the valley, or somewhat smaller with spectacular valley views. Service is first class, as is the hotel restaurant. The hotel managers, Sig. Marco Gamberucci and Signora Gamberucci, are degustatori professionisti, and have kindly offered a brief degustazione of local wines, oils, and cheeses.

Little Known Italy – BOLOGNA

Le Torri di Bologna

Le Due Torri

Bologna is without a doubt one of the most underrated cities in Italy. The capital of Emilia-Romagna, it is a city of about 1/3 million people, with ancient roots in pre-Roman Etruscan culture, a rich artistic heritage, a well-preserved historical center, and a coherent integration of the best that Italy has to offer in art, cuisine, architecture, and lifestyle. With a long tradition as a university city, probably the first in Europe, it is enlivened by the cultural and social contributions of young people who come from all over the world to study there. It is famous for its towers, its portici, and its centro storico, among the best-kept in Italy following a careful policy of preservation and restauration. Bologna has long enjoyed one of the most efficient and dedicated city administrations in all of Italy, and this is reflected in the efficiency of its services, the care with which the physical environment is maintained, and the smooth functioning of its civic institutions.

The relative obscurity of the city (compared to Florence and Venice, say), is perhaps due to the lack of an overarching artistic or architectural masterpiece to serve as a magnet for the attention of tourists and art aficionados, such as the David in Florence or the Sistine Chapel in Rome. And in fact the artistic importance of Bologna is due primarily to an homogeneous aggregation of first-class architectural and artistic masterpieces out of which it would be difficult to single out a distinct work for special recognition.