Tag Archives: Ferrari

A Tale of two Ferraris

Ferrari 330GTC

Ferrari 330GTC

So, moving from the general to the particular, the time has come (as W. said) to tell you about MY Ferraris. I have owned two of them, but alas, no longer! The first was a 1967 330GTC, an absolutely beautiful car that I had bought used for what now seems like a pittance. This was a significant car, and is certainly a collector’s item today. It sported the original V-12 Colombo-designed engine, carbureted, 330 cc per cylinder (that’s x12, if you want the engine size), 300 hp. This was one of a total run of 600 cars built by Ferrari in 1966 and 1967. It was the first Ferrari designed and built for the road: earlier models had all been essentially modified race cars. As such, it was equipped with air conditioning, electric window lifts, and other amenities that had been lacking in the more spartan earlier Ferraris. The steering, alas, was still unassisted, which made driving the car a chore at low speeds. But hey, I was 30 and in top shape, and I did my best to never slow down below 50 mph, so the problem was not serious (just kidding :-))

There were more macho cars coming out of Maranello at that time, notably the much-desired 275GTB/4, and of course there had been the GTO, but none that could match the understated elegance of the GTC’s flowing lines. The green paint was a non-Ferrari color, but it was hard to take issue with its soft metallic translucence. Of course the oval grille in the front shouted FERRARI at a distance. The car was robust and non-temperamental, a perfect rebuttal to all those silly stories about the unreliability of Italian cars. I owned it for several years, then, one fateful day, probably under the influence of some alien ray that completely befuddled my brain, I traded it in.

Romance, passion, secrets, victories… FERRARI!

Ferrari Enzo

Ferrari Enzo

Myths are never born by chance. They are not the result of coincidences, rather, they are the mark of destiny. Scuderia Ferrari was born in 1947.

As the Commendatore, at nearly 50, was finally realizing the dream that had obsessively directed his life and that was to revolutionize Italian industry, the current president of Scuderia Ferrari, Luca di Montezemolo, was being born in Bologna, not far from Maranello. Two men, one symbol: the Prancing Horse of Francesco Baracca.

The story of the House of Maranello is inextricably intertwined with the lives of these two strong and charismatic figures, each an expression of his time. The Grand Old Man became a myth in his own lifetime; he never left the legendary factory that had been his brainchild, to which he was attached with a visceral intensity. Indeed he had no need to go anywhere, for the world came to him instead: heads of governments, princes, kings, sports personalities, Hollywood celebrities made a beeline to place orders for the mechanical and aesthetic marvels that trickled from the fabled Maranello works.